A PHOTO

Public transport sketching #galaxynote3 #sketchbook #drawing #art

A TEXT POST

Art stuff & moving

I should know how to label boxes by now. And yet…. Also, what is with the pile of random things that build up on the floor whilst packing. Is it like the kitchen draw of miscellaneous things, only on the floor?

I think this sketch diary will work better when I have NEW GRAPHICS TABLET to play with. 


A TEXT POST

Doctor Doctor

Testing Samsung phone for quick on the go sketches. Samsung Galaxy Note 3, Autodesk Sketchbook for Galaxy.

So this was about 10-15min. About 10 minutes of that spent writing, and rewriting the text. Not happy with way the writing came out. I need to adjust brushes/erasers (once I learn how to).


A TEXT POST

Sketch Diary: Moving


No updates for the next two weeks. By then I should have new graphics tablet and will be doing more comics. Yay! Most of my art supplies are now at the new place. But I have my pen box and a single red pencil.

I hate packing, and unpacking. But at least I get to indulge and reorganise all of my books.

A TEXT POST

Sketch Diary: Cycling

I’m still uncertain if I volunteered or was volunteered. But well on the way to the $2500 needed to be raised.

Correction: 200+km from Melbourne (Albert Park) to the Mornington Peninsula and back again. So about 100km a day. Do-able, even for a couch potato.


A PHOTO

A new print is available to buy at Society6. All profits will be going towards the Ride to Conquer Cancer benefiting the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre(Melbourne, Australia). My sister is currently receiving treatment there and the money goes towards research and services that help her, and people like her to fight cancer.

It was drawn for a raffle (for the fundraiser) to be drawn on the 19th of July in Melbourne. It is a mixed media piece approximately 24x36cm on paper. Ink (india and coloured shellac inks), coloured pencil, and pastel.

If you want a chance to buy a raffle ticket or two in for a chance to win the original, please get in touch (michelle@maybestreet.com).

A TEXT POST

Food Court Gods

They are watching.


A PHOTO

jukeboxcomix:

GRAVE PART 1 IS COMPLETE AND HAS BEEN SENT TO PRINT!

I will be debuting the book at the Chicago Alternative Comics Expo.

To whet the appetite I’ve decided to compile the first 9 pgs for folks to read before the con.

http://issuu.com/jukeboxcomix/docs/grave_for_issue

Please reblog! Get the buzz going!

Cheers!

K

Reblogged from
A TEXT POST

Elsewhere: Tentacular, Tentacular

Rupa DasGupta is exhibiting her octopus drawings and paintings (from an octopus a day). I have some of these on my wall at home and they are lovely, so if you are in New Jersey go and have a look.

Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1448252775413248


A TEXT POST

Architectural Life, Death and Ghosts

"Architecture is never fully living, and is always passing out of existence; as it makes , so what it makes is inevitably unmade."  — Elizabeth Grosz in Marshall (2014)


"How important is it—if at all—for architects to consider the ultimate decay of the buildings they design? After all, it is the new building that realizes best their ideas, hopes, aspirations, and the prospect of its being diminished over time amounts to their diminishment, as well. … The most common thing is to forget about it … to deny it, much as we put out of our thoughts our own inevitable decay and extinction. We tend to proceed in life as though we will live forever, thereby remaining optimistic enough to believe what we do has some enduring value and meaning. Without this capacity for denial, most would become paralyzed by despair."  — Woods (2012)


"Keller Easterling offers subtraction as the key to reading terminal architecture. Buildings come down. In this destruction and fall are created abstract forms and room for speculative meditation. This is where poets find silence. Demolition, wilful damage, natural disaster and decay function for them as an ‘an operative practice.’ Architectural subtraction asks for patient and nuanced cohabitation with the conditions of wasting. These subtractive forces press a new intensity."  — Marshall (2014)


"Derrida asked that architecture bring back ‘the experience of its own ruin’, saying that architecture ‘ … carries within itself the traces of its future destruction, the already past future, future perfect, of its ruin…it is haunted, indeed signed, by the spectral silhouette of this ruin, at work even in the pedestal of its stone, in its metal or its glass.’ The book is about such hauntings."  — Marshall (2014)


"I personally find the Romantic fascination with ruins problematic. From Capar David Friedrich to Albert Speer (Hitler’s architect and town-planner). the evocative power of ruins has worked to produce powerful emotions, often for ideological—religious and political—purposes, making the motives exploitative, at the least. As a marketing device, nostalgic emotions of loss can sell paintings and politicians and their policies, but do little to advance knowledge."  — Woods (2012)


"The biggest risk in what I do is nostalgia. I’m trying to write history, of a sort, but the possibility that I could end up just going on about the good old days is one that worries me and I constantly try and draw back from."  — Owen Hatherley (2009)


"The Rubble Club is an organisation to remember buildings demolished in their architect’s lifetime. The Club is open to all who have had buildings destroyed in their lifetime. The Club has three key ground rules: Firstly the building’s architect must be alive and not party to its destruction, secondly the building must be built with the intention of permanence (exhibitions, shops and interiors are not eligible) and thirdly it must be deliberately destroyed or radically altered, it can’t simply burn down."  — The Rubble Club (2009)


Texts:

  • Cairns, Stephen and Jane M. Jacobs (2014), Buildings Must Die. A Perverse View of Architecture, MIT.

  • Hatherley, Owen and Andrew Stevens (2009), Militant Modernist: Owen Hatherley, 3:AM Magazine, Accessed: 1st June 204

  • Marshall, Richard (2014), buildings must die (review), 3:AM Magazine, Accessed: 1st June 2014

  • Woods, Lebbeus (2012), Inevitable Architecture, Accessed: 1st June 2014

  • About the Rubble Club (2009), The Rubble Club, Accessed: 1st June 2014.


Photos:

Mount Gambia Hospital (2006)

A TEXT POST

Quotes: Architectural Life, Death

"Architecture is never fully living, and is always passing out of existence; as it makes , so what it makes is inevitably unmade."  — Elizabeth Grosz in Marshall (2014)

"How important is it—if at all—for architects to consider the ultimate decay of the buildings they design? After all, it is the new building that realizes best their ideas, hopes, aspirations, and the prospect of its being diminished over time amounts to their diminishment, as well. … The most common thing is to forget about it … to deny it, much as we put out of our thoughts our own inevitable decay and extinction. We tend to proceed in life as though we will live forever, thereby remaining optimistic enough to believe what we do has some enduring value and meaning. Without this capacity for denial, most would become paralyzed by despair."  — Woods (2012)

"Keller Easterling offers subtraction as the key to reading terminal architecture. Buildings come down. In this destruction and fall are created abstract forms and room for speculative meditation. This is where poets find silence. Demolition, wilful damage, natural disaster and decay function for them as an ‘an operative practice.’ Architectural subtraction asks for patient and nuanced cohabitation with the conditions of wasting. These subtractive forces press a new intensity."  — Marshall (2014)

"Derrida asked that architecture bring back ‘the experience of its own ruin’, saying that architecture ‘ … carries within itself the traces of its future destruction, the already past future, future perfect, of its ruin…it is haunted, indeed signed, by the spectral silhouette of this ruin, at work even in the pedestal of its stone, in its metal or its glass.’ The book is about such hauntings."  — Marshall (2014)

"I personally find the Romantic fascination with ruins problematic. From Capar David Friedrich to Albert Speer (Hitler’s architect and town-planner). the evocative power of ruins has worked to produce powerful emotions, often for ideological—religious and political—purposes, making the motives exploitative, at the least. As a marketing device, nostalgic emotions of loss can sell paintings and politicians and their policies, but do little to advance knowledge."  — Woods (2012)

"The biggest risk in what I do is nostalgia. I’m trying to write history, of a sort, but the possibility that I could end up just going on about the good old days is one that worries me and I constantly try and draw back from."  — Owen Hatherley (2009)

"The Rubble Club is an organisation to remember buildings demolished in their architect’s lifetime. The Club is open to all who have had buildings destroyed in their lifetime. The Club has three key ground rules: Firstly the building’s architect must be alive and not party to its destruction, secondly the building must be built with the intention of permanence (exhibitions, shops and interiors are not eligible) and thirdly it must be deliberately destroyed or radically altered, it can’t simply burn down."  — The Rubble Club (2009)

Texts:

  • Cairns, Stephen and Jane M. Jacobs (2014), Buildings Must Die. A Perverse View of Architecture, MIT.

  • Hatherley, Owen and Andrew Stevens (2009), Militant Modernist: Owen Hatherley, 3:AM Magazine, Accessed: 1st June 204

  • Marshall, Richard (2014), buildings must die (review), 3:AM Magazine, Accessed: 1st June 2014

  • Woods, Lebbeus (2012), Inevitable Architecture, Accessed: 1st June 2014

  • About the Rubble Club (2009), The Rubble Club, Accessed: 1st June 2014.

A TEXT POST

Society 6

I have started to add a few prints to Society 6 ( http://society6.com/maybestreet ). Some are designed as prints (Tree), and others are by request (Mermaid in a Cocktail Glass). Prints start at $18.

I’m just trying the service out at the moment, but have heard good things about the quality of prints, so please let me now how it goes.